The ‘Three Principles’ Understanding of How the Mind Works: An Overview

Background

The Three Principles is an understanding of how the mind works, and thereby an understanding of how we experience life — moment by moment and day by day. This understanding of how the mind works describes three fundamental elements or ‘principles’ — thought, consciousness and mind — and how these principles combine to create our experience of life. When we understand how we generate our experience of life, we realise that we have the ability to reduce psychological distresses (e.g. …


An overview

Background

The Three Principles is an understanding of how the mind works, and thereby an understanding of how we experience life — moment by moment and day by day. This understanding of how the mind works describes three fundamental elements or ‘principles’ — thought, consciousness and mind — and how these principles combine to create our experience of life. When we understand how we generate our experience of life, we realise that we have the ability to reduce psychological distresses (e.g. stress, fear, compulsions, pressure, and discouragement) and uncover our inner well-being.

Connected to ideas in a number of eastern philosophies…


About Anthony Kessel

Professor Anthony Kessel is a public health physician, academic and author. Since 2019 Anthony has been working as Clinical Director (National Clinical Policy) at NHS England & Improvement. Prior to this, Anthony worked for a decade as Director of Global Public Health at Public Health England and National Director of Public Health Strategy, Director of R&D and Medical Director at the Health Protection Agency. Anthony’s other leadership responsibilities in these roles included antimicrobial resistance, pandemic influenza, climate change, professional development, clinical governance, and responsibility for the revalidation of 600 medical consultants across the national public health system…


Blogs | The Society of Authors

Author and physician Anthony Kessel on uncertainty and coping in the time of Covid

As a teenager in the 1980s I read the full set of John Wyndham books. Although I can’t now remember all the details, I can still powerfully recall a recurrent theme. Wyndham liked to explore what happens to human beings — and to the human race — when presented with something out of the normal, something literally extra-ordinary. It was blindness and giant carnivorous plants in The Day of the Triffids; a dormant sea monster that stirs in The Kraken Wakes; and in the village of The Midwich Cuckoos alien-infected children’s minds exert telepathic control over the world. …


Global Health Experience

In her seminal book, Health, Civilization and the State: a history of public health from ancient to modern times, the academic historian, Dorothy Porter, defines public health as “collective action in relation to the health of populations”. Of the many definitions of public health that exist, this has always been my favourite because it de-medicalises public health, shifts attention away from professional groups or infectious diseases, and emphasises the central importance of people working together to improve the health and well-being of communities. …


Global Health Experience

April 2017

“Reculer pour mieux sauter”

Over lunch last month in a restaurant in Lahore, a colleague from the Punjab Ministry of Health told a story she’d heard on a recent work trip to Turkey. The fable, as I’ve since researched, is well-known in Turkish folklore and will be familiar to those who have visited the Maiden’s Tower in Istanbul. According to legend, on a tiny islet off the city’s coast an emperor had a tower built after an oracle prophesied that his beloved daughter would be killed by a venomous snake by her eighteenth birthday. To thwart the prediction…


Security: global, collective, and inner

July 2016

“Deep roots are not reached by the frost” [JRR Tolkien]

The past month has been an unusual one, by any account.

Early on, I finished a novel, Remainder, by Tom McCarthy, in which the protagonist is hit on the head by falling scaffolding, leading to brain injuries that necessitate months of rehabilitation. The required re-learning of life’s everyday activities make our anti-hero lose touch with reality, leading him down the most extraordinary path in an effort to re-connect with human existence. …


The problem with self

June 2016

The problem with self

“Through pride we are ever deceiving ourselves. But deep down below the surface of the average conscience a still, small voice says to us, something is out of tune” (C J Jung)

I’m not much of a science fiction fan, perhaps due to a preference for focusing on the present, but I recently read an article in which the author Philip K Dick — famous for adaptations of his books into films such as Blade Runner and Total Recall — was credited with suggesting that “the problem with introspection is…


About the Author

Professor Anthony Kessel is a public health physician, academic and author. Since 2019 Anthony has been working as Clinical Director (National Clinical Policy) at NHS England & Improvement. Prior to this, Anthony worked for a decade as Director of Global Public Health at Public Health England and National Director of Public Health Strategy, Director of R&D and Medical Director at the Health Protection Agency. Anthony’s other leadership responsibilities in these roles included antimicrobial resistance, pandemic influenza, climate change, professional development, clinical governance, and responsibility for the revalidation of 600 medical consultants across the national public health system…


A commitment to lifelong learning

May 2016

“The world as we have created it is a process of our thinking. It cannot be changed without changing our thinking” (Albert Einstein)

In the early 1990s, lyrics to a song by the strangely named band ‘The The’ struck a chord: “If you can’t change your world, change yourself. And if you can’t change yourself then change your world”. I have no idea whether the song-writer was familiar with Einstein’s works or musings, but the ideas behind both quotes came to mind when I spent a week last month in the Netherlands.

The…

Anthony Kessel

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